Showing posts with label Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Show all posts

Sunday, 31 May 2015

"If you twist for anyone, they like the twisted shape of you not you." - Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie tells women.

Award winning novelist, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, yesterday had the honour of giving the commencement speech to the class of 2015 at Wellesley College, Massachusetts. She spoke on her favourite topic, Feminism. She urged the graduates to try their best to change the world to one more equal for men and for women by giving men the freedom to be vulnerable, and women, the choice to be strong.
Excerpt and video from her speech below:

We can not always bend the world into the shapes we want but we can try, we can make a concerted and real and true effort. And you are privileged that, because of your education here, you have already been given many of the tools that you will need to try. Always just try. Because you never know. 
And so as you graduate, as you deal with your excitement and your doubts today, I urge you to try and create the world you want to live in. Minister to the world in a way that can change it. Minister radically in a real, active, practical, get your hands dirty way.

Saturday, 21 September 2013

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie & her husband Dr Ivara Esege. (Photos)

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award winning writer is happily married to Dr Ivara Esege. They have been married for several years now She describes him as Nigerian,American and British. They divide their time between Nigeria and America.
See more pix after the cut:

Wednesday, 17 July 2013

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie wins 2013 Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize for fiction


Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s third novel AMERICANAH has been awarded the 2013 Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize for fiction. The Heartland Prize is a literary prize created in 1988 by the Chicago Tribune Newspaper. According to Elizabeth Taylor, the literary editor of the Chicago Tribune, the prize is awarded yearly in two categories, fiction and non-fiction, to books that are concerned with American issues, causes and concerns.

"We loved AMERICANAH. It’s a powerful, resonant novel and we would be delighted to celebrate it and try to share it with a wider audience," Taylor wrote.

"I’m very pleased," Adichie said on receiving news of the prize. "You never know what will happen when you write a novel. And for me, a Nigerian, to have written this book which is partly about America, and to receive this quintessentially American prize means that I have said something about America as seen through Nigerian eyes that Americans find interesting. I take that as a wonderful compliment. It reminds me of the ability of literature to make us become briefly alive in bodies not our own."